Patrick Brown is a ruined man

mudslinging and grandstanding

Is it just me or is something fishy going on?  Patrick Brown, the (resigned) leader of the PC party, is a ruined man, regardless of whether he is innocent or guilty. Whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty?  He has not been my choice to lead the PC party, but I think the whole scandal stinks.  Here’s why:

  • the “victims” remain anonymous
  • who talked  them into coming forward and why did they not go to the police instead of the media?
  • why did they take so long (10 years) to come forward?  Oh right, an election is coming up and a smear campaign is the best way for the Liberal party to deflect from the mess they are in.
  • what was the under aged woman doing in a bar drinking in the first place.  I wasn’t born yesterday, I know it happens, but did Patrick Brown take her there?  No.  Was he drinking?  No.  Did he buy her a drink?  Yes, but is that a crime?  If every male that meets a woman in a bar and buys her a drink is persecuted, the heterosexual orientation is doomed.
  • why did the other woman go to his home? With another male to boot.  Then when in his home agree to go into the bedroom.
  • when she (a bit late in my opinion) said NO, he took her home.  How awful and ungentlemanly. (NOT)

These are just a few of the “facts” that are swirling around this scandal.    Regardless of whether Patrick Brown is guilty or innocent, he is a ruined man.  I feel very sorry for him and any other heterosexual male playing the dating game these days, especially the ones in the public eye.

The Ultimate Price

ultimate price in Ottawa Market

The headlines read: “two dead, one injured in Ottawa’s Byward Market shootings.” The 43-year-old man that was shot and killed paid the ultimate price believing he was helping his friend.  

photo credit

When his friend was shot and wounded after an argument with the gunman, the victim and several other witnesses chased the shooter.  Why would he do this?  No one will ever know what he hoped to accomplish.  

As the details of the tragedy continue to unravel,  the media is quick to point out the victim’s failings.  Nothing, however, has been said about the suspect.

Although the victim had a shady (drug-related) past, I only knew him as the beloved brother of my grandson’s mom.  Why is that?  Because he and his family were trying hard to put that shady past behind them.  He had turned his life around so we (my family) knew him as a loving son, husband, father, brother, uncle, and brother-in-law that would do just about anything for anyone in need.

What the media fails to mention is that no one, nowhere, deserves to be gunned down in cold blood, unless of course they have just shot and killed someone themselves. The fact that some people resort to the use of a gun to settle their arguments sickens, and in this case deeply saddens me.

For the sake of the victim’s shocked, grieving family, I hope the investigation wraps up soon and reveals that the victim’s alcohol-induced actions were confrontational and foolish, but valiant and well-intended. He paid the ultimate price.

Scams: Be Alert, Know How to Detect Them

money

I received two more scams today by email.  The first one was from someone claiming to be “checking my Netflix account.”  They (in broken English and poor spelling) wanted me to click on a link to verify my account information with a threat that my family’s access to Netflix would be cut off if I did not follow the instructions.

The second scam was an email from someone claiming to be from Canada Post telling me I had a package that they tried to deliver but no one was home.  Again, they asked me to click on a link to verify my information and find out where to pick up my package.

How the Scammers get Your Money

Both are scams, looking to get information on unsuspecting individuals.  Popular services (such as Netflix and Canada Post) are being targeted because many people use and rely on them.  Clicking on the link provided will introduce a virus into your computer which will track personal information including banking details.

Clicking on the link provided in these scams will introduce a virus into your computer which will track personal information including banking details.  Instead of clicking on the link, delete the suspicious email immediately.

Clues to Detect Scams

Here are a few clues that should make you suspect an emailed scam:

  • poor grammar and spelling in the content
  • telling you about something you did not order (packages)  Canada Post would never email you if they stop by and no one is home, they leave a notice at your door.
  • offers of refunds or money for nothing or ways to help you save.  If it sounds too good to be true, it is!
  • emails from someone you know that do not make sense, are very vague (i think you might be interested in this)  or contain a link you know nothing about
  • emails asking for information the (fake) sender (eg. CRA, bank etc) would already have on file
  • they are providing a service you did not request.  For example, they are telling you something is wrong with your computer and want you to log in so they can “help you fix the problem”
  • miracle cures of any sort (skin care, weight loss, etc etc) go under the “too good to be true” category
  • reputable companies do NOT ask for updated personal information via email

Other Forms of Scams

A PREVIOUS POST talked about scams you might encounter when shopping online. Remember and be aware that perpetrators can find innocent, unsuspecting victims by email, phone, regular mail and even at your front door.  With modern technology, the world is becoming a much smaller place.  Scams, especially ones through email, can and do come from anywhere in the world today.

Be Suspicious, Do Some Research

If you are even the least bit suspicious, google the company represented to see if there are any known scams associated with that company.  Use information available online to educate and protect yourself and others.  For example, I googled Netflix scam, and guess what, a whole list of results turned up.  This particular scam has been going on across Canada for a while now.   Remember, the company is not at fault, they are being used too.  The scammers are relying on these reputable, trusted and popular companies to get your attention.

Delete, Share the Knowledge, and Report the Scam

After you delete the offending email, share the knowledge and warn your friends, family members, and neighbours.  The RCMP has a website for you to report SCAMS  and other fraudulent activity.

Be scam savvy!

photo credit

Elder Abuse: What is it and How does it Happen?

Elder abuse can be defined as mental or physical abuse inflicted on an elderly person by someone they trust and depend on to provide them with the basic necessities of life, including companionship, transportation, food, and personal care.  

Who Can be an Abuser of the Elderly?

The abuser can be a friend or family member in a home setting or a staff member at a retirement home.  Elder abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse, neglect, financial abuse, or mental abuse.  In many cases, it is a combination of all of these abuses.

How are Elders Being Abused?

Sexual abuse is any unwanted sexual activity or sexual assault.  Neglect is the failure to provide food or health services for a dependent elder.  Financial abuse can include stealing money or pension cheques, committing forgery, fraud, or extortion, misusing a power of attorney, or forcing an elderly person to sell their property or other assets. Mental abuse can include threatening, coercing, embarrassing, humiliating, frightening, or insulting an elderly person, hiding their eyeglasses, dentures, or hearing aids, or treating them like a child.  All of these forms of abuse are considered crimes and should be reported.

The Signs of Elder Abuse

The signs and symptoms of elder abuse may include depression, anxiety, poor hygiene, dehydration, weight loss, and over sedation.  The abuser may not allow visitors and socially isolate the elder, even from family members, often destroying family relationships in the process.  

Abusers often have drug or alcohol problems, antisocial behaviour, or mental problems.  The abuse takes place because the abuser has control or power over the victim, often because the abuser is the primary caregiver and threatens to leave the victim alone.

It sickens me to know that there are people out there that prey on the elderly.  In researching the subject, I have learned that for every case of elder abuse that is discovered and reported, there are thousands of others that are slipping through the cracks.  

Be Alert! Do not let this happen to someone you care about!