Five Languages of Love

Five Languages of Love

This is an old post, from 2016, with a few additions. The five languages of love are important tools in successful relationships so this post is worth repeating.

Recently I heard about “the five languages of love” so decided to research the theory.

What are the Languages of Love?

The thought process in the languages of love theory is that people vary in what they need from their partner to make them happy and content in a relationship. The five options or “languages” are listed as:

  • words of affirmation
  • acts of service
  • receiving gifts
  • quality time
  • physical touch

How to Use the Languages of Love

Simply put, if you want to be in a successful relationship, you have to know what your partner’s love language is and make sure your partner knows what your love language is, especially if they differ.  Since both people in a relationship can come from different upbringings, backgrounds, cultures, etc, their individual love languages will often be different.  Acknowledging that your partner has a different love language than you do appears to be the first step towards a successful relationship.

I would imagine that some people are content with just one language of love while others need more than one.  That’s where it might get tricky as your job in a successful relationship is to provide what your partner needs.   Some people are needier than others and needs do change throughout life. Be aware of changing needs on both sides and be prepared to adjust accordingly.  Frequent re-evaluation is highly recommended.

Do Your Homework

If you are not sure what your language of love is, ask yourself what makes you feel loved. What makes you feel unloved is important too.

Do your homework.  Find out what your partner’s language of love is.  Make sure they know what yours is. Be sure to ask them theirs and tell them yours so there is no room for misunderstanding.  Do not assume you know theirs or they know yours.

My Language of Love

I know my language of love is “acts of service.” I don’t need expensive gifts or fancy words or someone to hold my hand. I do however like to know that when I need support or something (that I cannot do myself) done, I know where to turn. 

“Acts of service” sound very rigid, almost implying contractual services. I’m pretty sure the experts do not mean that instead mean sharing duties or things that need to get done in a household. Things such as:

  • household chores like cleaning, cooking, grocery shopping
  • parenting things (I won’t call them chores) like playing, feeding, bathing, bedtime routines
  • shovelling snow and cleaning off vehicles (although I do love to shovel for exercise in the winter)

I am so impressed with how the younger generation has removed the gender-based roles in relationships. I know, I am dating myself. No longer is it only the mother/woman’s role to cook, clean, look after the kids while the father/man’s role is to go to work outside the home. Part of this evolution came about with the increase in double-income families, but another is acceptance, acknowledgment, respect, and compromise. I am so proud of my two oldest sons who have embraced this evolution, actively and emotionally committing to their roles as daddy and husband/partner.

I broaden the term “service” to include acts of kindness too. Nothing (to me) is more attractive (on anyone) than kindness. Conversely, meanness is very unattractive.

My Parents’ Language of Love

So, how do we develop our own language of love? Do we inherit it from our parents, like we inherit eye colour and other physical characteristics or interests and talents?

I assume my own preference is because my parents (at least in my perception of their relationship) used that method to show they loved each other and our family. We were not ones to express our love verbally, in fact, I don’t remember either of my parents ever saying “I love you” to each other or to us kids. But they both worked outside the home (my mom only after my youngest brother started school) to provide a home, food, and clothing for our family.

Were my parents happy in their relationship? Not always. I do know my father was devastated when my mother passed away, and her last words to me were “look after your father.”

Actions speak louder than words.

Raising our own Children

That language of love witnessed in my childhood (my husband was raised similarly) is most likely why we raised our children with the “acts of service” language. We knew no different. I know my children know we would do anything for them, still, even though they are now self-sufficient. Is that because we told them that fact often? No, but I hope we showed them with our actions.

I admit that I never gave much thought about what they needed or still need to feel loved, just assumed they knew/know.

I probably do not tell them I love them often enough; it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

The Five Languages of Love

National Siblings Day

Although National Siblings Day is purported to be an American thing, I am taking it international today, making it a Canadian tradition as well.  It seems that large families are a thing of the past.  However, when I was young it was much more common.  Most of my friends and relatives were members of a large family.  This was mine..

national siblings day

In keeping with the times, (but not with the Jones’, that was something different) my poor mother had six children within eight years, as many other mothers did then. My siblings were my first friends, teachers, co-conspirators, adversaries, and sometimes even (so we thought at the time) enemies. I cannot imagine being raised in a different dynamic. I am convinced that being raised in such a tight environment turned us all into hard-working, ambitious, successful adults.  The fact that money was tight and very frugally spent also had a huge impact on the adults we have become.

Siblings Day

This picture was taken (almost) 24 years ago, the summer our mother was diagnosed with and died of lung cancer.  Living far away from each other, this was the last time all six of us siblings have been together.  We came the closest last summer when five of six of us got together to celebrate my eldest son’s wedding.

This next picture is of our extended families (minus one sister and hers) at my son’s wedding.

national siblings day

Osprey in Lanark, Ontario

 

On our way to the cottage last weekend, we stopped to watch a huge (?osprey) nest that is perched on top of a light stand at the edge of a baseball field in Lanark, Ontario.  Apparently, it is very common for osprey to build their nests on manmade structures such as telephone or light poles.  As we watched one large bird and one small bird in the nest, another large (adult) bird approached to feed the baby.  This is another time I wish I had a camera with a better zoom lens to get a closer shot of the mother and baby birds.  As usual, I had to resort to the camera on my phone.

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:

Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at YOUR DAILY CHUCKLE

and

be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW

My gardening website can be viewed at www.gardens4u.ca

Fat Bastard Merlot and gardening gloves

Buying my favourite red wine recently at the LCBO, my husband noticed that each bottle of Fat Bastard Merlot had a free pair of gardening gloves attached to it…

 

What a great promotion, perfect for red wine and garden lovers like me!

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:

Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at YOUR DAILY CHUCKLE

and

be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW

My gardening website can be viewed at www.gardens4u.ca

Storm clouds

These storm clouds circled us on Palmerston Lake this past Friday night, but we did not receive any rain until early Monday morning…

 

In fact, after the stars and moon chased away the clouds, we were able to enjoy our first campfire of the season since the fire ban had finally been lifted in the North Frontenac area…

20160722_213545

 

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:

Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at YOUR DAILY CHUCKLE

and

be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW

My gardening website can be viewed at www.gardens4u.ca

Another beautiful garden

Well, I cannot take credit for this beautiful garden, but I do enjoy visiting it every second week to keep it looking its best while the owners spend the summer at their cottage…

can you tell I love my job?

 

 

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:

Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at YOUR DAILY CHUCKLE

and

be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW

My gardening website can be viewed at www.gardens4u.ca

Bunnies: Beware of Disturbing Them When Gardening!

While weeding a large garden last week, my son and I came across a burrow of bunnies.  Fortunately, I was on my hands and knees, pulling weeds out from around the base of a lilac tree when I saw something move in the dirt, otherwise, I might have accidentally hurt the four or five tiny bunnies tucked into a hole (burrow) at the base of the tree.  They were only a few inches long, with no hair.  The only way I could tell they were rabbits was by their long feet and the shape of their ears…

As soon as I (accidentally) touched their hiding spot, they started to scramble around…

bunnies!

Within a few moments though, the clumps of fur were back on top of the burrow, hiding them from sight.  I put some weeds back in place around them to protect them from predators, as well as hot sun or drenching rain…

My son wanted to take them home, but I convinced him that they still needed their mother.  He googled some information and discovered that the mother rabbit will return to check on them and feed them every 24 hours by standing over the burrow.  Perhaps they were scrambling for the top of the hole when I disturbed them, thinking I was their mother returning for a feeding!

My client promised to keep an eye on the bunnies; I am curious to see how long it takes for them to become independent.  

Perhaps I can put them to work helping me keep the weeds down LOL.

Cool wet weather great for weeding

The cool, wet weather we had last week was great for weeding gardens.    Without removing the whole root system of the weeds, they will quickly return to spoil your gardens. After a hard rain, it is much easier to remove the weed roots intact…

 

A well-mulched garden also makes it easier to remove weed roots intact.  Weed roots growing in soil seem to resist removal, often breaking off in the soil, leaving pieces of the root behind to continue growing.   When growing in mulch, the weed roots come out intact with much less effort.

 

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:

Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at YOUR DAILY CHUCKLE

and

be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW

My gardening website can be viewed at www.gardens4u.ca

 

So much for an early spring!

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The groundhog that predicted an early spring when he did not see his shadow in February must have lied.  It is freezing out today; minus 6 degrees Celcius (21F) here in Ottawa   I bet that darned groundhog is hiding somewhere warm!

 

Please be sure to visit my other blogs:

Laugh out loud (LOL) with me at YOUR DAILY CHUCKLE

and

be inspired and motivated by famous words of wisdom at WoW

My gardening website can be viewed at www.gardens4u.ca