Cold Weather, can one be Allergic to it?

cold weather

This is an old post that I was reminded of this morning with the frigid weather forecast. The walls of our house were actually creaking (more like loud bangs) in protest the night before, warning us that the cold is coming. The post is still relevant, except for the hockey arena part. I miss the hockey games, but not the cold bleachers we had to park our butts on….

Allergy to Cold Weather

I am seriously starting to wonder if I am allergic to the cold weather we (too) often experience here in Ottawa, Canada.  As soon as I go outside my nose starts to drip. Seriously. December, January, and February are the worst, but I don’t mind saying I get tired of it. Fast. Usually, as soon as Christmas is over.

My body is not coping well with the cold, so it makes it difficult to want to go outside for anything that is not absolutely necessary. The cold is wreaking havoc with a perennial New Year’s resolution to get more exercise since walking is usually my main form of exercise between November and March when my gardens are covered in snow. To remedy this, I have taken up doing planks which are great for my muscles, especially the core muscles, but don’t contribute to the cardiovascular exercise I need. 

Conditions Aggravated by Cold Weather

I know cold can aggravate conditions like Raynaud’s Phenomenon where blood flow is restricted to the body’s extremities when they get cold.  Cold can also aggravate arthritis causing joint pain

My problem is neither of these conditions.  My whole body seems to ache when I get cold.  If my feet get cold, the aching pain starts in my feet and ankles, but then moves up my legs to my hips too.  The pain actually feels like my bones are aching.  Sitting in a cold car or cold hockey arena watching my son play can easily set the aching off.  When this happens I find heat and Advil are the only remedies. 

Heating Pads to Treat Symptoms

I purchased a click heat pad recently; it works great…

Click Heat

Simply press the small metal disc that is floating inside the heating pad to activate it.  As soon as the disc is pressed, the pad heats up and gets firm.  It stays warm for hours, so you can move it around to heat all of your achy body parts.  When it cools off, all you have to do is place the pad in boiling water to return it to its liquid state. 

 Click Heat comes in many shapes, colors, and sizes. If you think you may be allergic to cold weather too, pick up your heat pad, they do help.

Or head south to enjoy some warmer temperatures. I hear Mexico is nice this time of year!

photo credit: Ruvim Miksanskiy, pexels.com