Posted in DIY, food, loreeebee.ca, nutrition

Hot Soup For Cold Days

There is nothing like a hot bowl of soup on a cold day. One of my favourite activities in fall is making homemade soup. I call it leftover soup because I use up all the broth and bones taking up space in my freezer as well as any leftover vegetables in my fridge. Homemade is also much more nutritious and tasty than store-bought soups.

How to Create Your Own Broth

I love to make my own broth, mainly because store-bought broth is laden with salt and other ingredients I cannot or don’t care to pronounce or put in my body. I use this homemade broth by the spoonful in sauces or larger amounts in soups and stews.

Every time I roast meat, whether turkey, chicken, pork or beef, I save the pan drippings in a bucket that is stored in my freezer. All the drippings go into the same bucket until its full and I need to start a new bucket. Each addition freezes in a separate layer with the fat rising to the top of each layer. When you remove the broth for use, the fat is easy to scrape off for discarding.

I also add the nutrient-packed liquid left at the bottom of the dish after steaming vegetables to my broth buckets. Another trick is to freeze the tough broccoli stalks you trim off the heads to prepare for meals. Freeze them in another bag.

Storing Bones

Bones from roasted meat are also easily stored in the freezer for later use in soups, simply put them in a sealable plastic bag, squish the air out, and freeze. Turkey legs end up in a freezer bag as no one in my household likes to eat them when they are freshly roasted. These legs have lots of meat on them too, which falls off the bones as you simmer them on soup making day.

I only freeze large bones, as the smaller ones are difficult to get all the tiny bones separated from the meat. The larger leg bones are easily retrieved after simmering.

Leftovers in Soup

Leftovers taking up space in your fridge are also great in soups. The remainder of last night’s broccoli, mushrooms, corn, rice, pasta or quinoa all add bulk to your soups. If you are not making soup within a few days of preparing these leftovers, add them to the collection in your freezer.

Harvested Vegetables

If you grow your own vegetables, as many decided to do during the pandemic, you can freeze any you harvest for later use. I don’t grow that many that I cannot eat as I harvest, but I know those that do! On a recent trip to my favourite farm, my aunt sent me home with lots of tomatoes and instructions on how to roast them with garlic. After following her instructions, I gave several buckets away, but ended up with some in my freezer too.

Conclusion

By now you can probably see why I enjoy making soup in the fall. Not only do I end up with a delicious and nutritious meal but my freezer gets cleaned out too!

What do you put in your homemade soups?

Hot Soup For Cold Days
turkey quinoa soup
Posted in food, health and wellness, lorieb.com

Hearty and healthy home made soup recipes

I would love to share my recipes for home made soup.  If I had any.  I used to make soup for my mother in law years ago.  Her only complaint was that I could never produce a recipe for the different varieties. I was just reminded of this dilemma when my daughter in law asked for the recipe for my last batch of home made soup.

Since I was diagnosed with a sensitivity to wheat, I put much more emphasis on ensuring the ingredients I use for my soups (and any other cooking and baking) are completely natural and healthy.  No preservatives or artificial ingredients are allowed in these recipes. This is also particularly important if you are sharing your soup with friends or family undergoing chemotherapy treatments.

Most of my soups are meat based, but you could make them to your specific dietary needs or preferences.  Here are a few tips.

  • store large bones from chicken and turkey dinners in ziplock bag in your freezer
  • also store pan drippings and liquid from vegetables in the freezer.  I use a plastic bucket for this purpose and just keep adding to the contents. Don’t be afraid to mix the different meats and vegetables , the mixture adds unique flavor to your soups. As soon as your contributions cool off, the fat will rise to the top and create a layer.  You should scrape of this layer (it comes off easily) before you add another one.
  • On soup making day, place the bones in a large pot, fill the pot with water and simmer for several hours.
  • Add garlic cloves, a chuck of ginger root and or turmeric (the stuff curry powder comes from), bay leaves or any other seasonings large enough to remove easily.  You can use powdered forms at a later stage if you don’t have the fresh stuff handy.  I have also added broccoli stalks (frozen, stored in freezer like the broths) at this stage.
  • After a few hours, remove the bones and seasonings, set aside to cool.
  • Next add frozen chunks of broth you have stored in the freezer.  You now have your base.
  • When your bones have cooled, pick off any meat from them and add them to the pot. Crush any softened garlic, ginger, adding to the pot.  Discard bay leaves if used. Puree  or chop broccoli stalks if used.  If you are using powdered spices like ginger, garlic, curry powder etc, add it now.
  • This is the time to add rice, quinoa or barley for added nutrients and chunkiness.
  • Add vegetables and or legumes.  Cherry or grape tomatoes, beans, frozen corn are my favourites.  When using beans, I do use canned, but the “no salt added” kind.  I rinse them really well before adding to the soup.
  • If you prefer creamy as opposed to chunky soups, you could puree everything at this stage.
  • Add salt (I use pink Himalayan) and or pepper to taste.
  • Add milk (I use almond milk) if your soup is too chunky or thick.

Don’t be afraid to mix up your variations. I prefer the hearty, chunky varieties with lots of ingredients, but others prefer simple broths.  I also like lots of garlic and ginger, but reduced these ingredients in my last batch so I could share some with my breastfeeding daughter in law.

If you like to record your recipes (and you might if you share your concoctions) write down what you have added.  For some reason, I never think to do so.