Neuroplasticity: for ADHD and More

I came across a fascinating article recently on how neurons (brain cells) can be trained or rewired to overcome disease, conditions, and injury. To clarify, this training process is called neuroplasticity, currently used with success on both adults and children.

Likewise, Medicinenet defines neuroplasticity as:

 The brain’s ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections throughout life. Neuroplasticity allows the neurons (nerve cells) in the brain to compensate for injury and disease and to adjust their activities in response to new situations or to changes in their environment

Medicinenet.com

Children and Neuroplasticity

Are you worried about your child(ren) and their inability to focus and behave? Are they falling behind in school? Learn how you can help them rewire their brains without the band-aid fix of medication. Watch this:

Methods by Maxi Mind

These methods in the video may appear simple, too good to be true, but apparently they can work wonders to achieve mental focus.

Juggling

Who knew? Juggling obviously takes physical dexterity but did you know it also trains your brain to focus? This video can teach you the (??) simple steps to learn the technique…

Bean Bag Toss

If juggling doesn’t appeal to you or seems too complicated, try the simpler focusing trick of a bean bag toss. Throw a bean bag from one hand to the other, ensuring the bag only goes to eye level; watch it go back and forth.

Atlassian for Neuroplasticity Exercises

Exercises, techniques and tips from Atlassian will help boost your productivity by training and looking after your brain. Poor concentration, poor memory and more can be a thing of the past.

neuroplasticity and Atlassian

POND: Province of Ontario Neurodevelopmental Disorders

POND translates scientific research on various neurodevelopmental disorders into treatment practices. Make physical appointments or receive news and resources in newsletter format through a mailing list. Take part in a research study; get involved directly.

C8 Sciences Reports on Neuroplasticity

C8 Sciences explains how to shape the brain with activity. Nobel-prize-winning research has shown that neuroplasticity is most effective in young children. The belief that kid’s brains are like sponges just happens to be true; they soak up more knowledge and training before the age of five than anyone does in later years.

Conclusions

I’ve learned it’s never too late to rewire or train your brain. Whether you play Wordle every day or learn to juggle, make sure you keep your brain exercised!

Even more significant, this research supports the possibility of rewiring the brains of children afflicted with learning disorders or behavioral problems. In short, many of these issues show up when children reach school age. What have you got to lose when you or your child’s teachers notice your child is struggling?

In summary, it is important to recognize the struggle and do anything you can to help.

Adult ADHD, Does the Shoe Fit?

I read an article recently by Charlotte Hilton Andersen entitled 12 Signs of Adult ADHD and am amazed at how many of the signs apply to me. I’m not sure why I am amazed, but I am. Perhaps because way back when I was a kid, ADHD was not yet a popular diagnosis.

I’ve always assumed it is my impatient personality (I am an Aries, and Arians are known for being impatient) that prevents me from tackling projects that take too long to complete. Take sewing for example. I have created several quilts over the years, but they take me forever to complete. I do however, fare better if I have a specific deadline to meet. I much prefer the DIY projects that I can finish off in a day or two. My success rate for those is much higher. I don’t have time to get distracted.

This aversion to time-consuming projects explains why I donated fabric when my neighbour began sewing masks in the fight against COVID-19, instead of offering to sew any myself. You can probably guess where the fabric came from…yes, unfinished quilts. I am just happy this fabric I had good intentions of using (someday) has (finally) gone to good use, instead of taking up space in storage buckets.

Oh, and quitting the yoga session before the final relaxation step? That is so me!

Surely I am not the only one. How many of these signs apply to you? I can think of a few people I know of, but I won’t name any names.

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